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Archive for the ‘structural design’ Category

Aerospace Museum, Jeju Island, South Korea

Posted by ewanvfe on 18/05/2009


The country’s first Aerospace Museum commences build
The tourist hotspot of Jeju Island off Korea’s south border is adding the country’s first Aerospace Museum to it’s list of attractions. Jutting out of the green landscape like a spaceship has landed, the metallic cylindrical structure represents a move towards technological standing on the island, currently campaigning to become a ‘Global Education City’.

Aiming for completion in 2013, US$50.8 million has been invested in the project by the Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs.

Covering 329,000 sq m of ground, Aerospace museum is comprised of the Aerial History Hall, Air Force History Exhibition Hall, Space Gallery, 4D Cinema, 4D Planetariums, and Training Center. An ‘outdoor monorail’ will be installed and a visual simulation of an air lane will be provided in the sky to deliver the real sensation of flying to visitors. Observatories are also scheduled to be installed.

The Korean Air Force have agreed to provide 50 aircrafts for the site as well as historical resources. Free outdoor exhibitions will take place including five theme exhibitions, namely Air Combat, Flight Training, Search & Rescue Flight, Military Airbus, and ‘Invisible Force’.

Jeju Island is undergoing six major projects to become a ‘Global city’: Health Care Town, English Education City, Jeju Science Park, Resort-type Residential Complex, Myths and History Theme Park, and Seogwipo Tourism Port. With the exception of Health Care Town and English Education City, the four projects have already been initiated.

source: http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com
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Dragonfly, New York, United States

Posted by ewanvfe on 18/05/2009


Dragonfly concept aims for ecological self-sufficiency in New York
The latest concept design from Vincent Callebaut Architects – the Dragonfly – has been designed with the intention of easing the ever-increasing need for ecological and environmental self-sufficiency in the urban cityscape. The proposed development, designed around the Southern bank of Roosevelt Island in New York, follows a vertical farm design which, it is hoped, would cultivate food, agriculture, farming and renewable energy in an urban setting.

The unique 128 floor, 700m concept design is spread over two oblong towers and suggests building a prototype of an urban farm in which a mixed programme of housing, offices, laboratories and farming spaces are vertically laid out over several floors and cultivated by its inhabitants. The architecture of the design proposes reinventing the vertical building, so associated with the New York skyline of the 19th and 20th centuries, both structurally and functionally as well as ecologically.

The functional organisation of the design is arranged around two 600m towers, symmetrically arranged around a huge climactic greenhouse that links them, and constructed of glass and steel. This greenhouse, which defines the shape of the design, supports the load of the building and is directly inspired by the structural exoskeleton of dragonfly wings. Two inhabited rings buttress around the ‘wings,’ and along the exterior of these are solar panels, which will provide up to half the buildings electricity, with the rest being supplied by three wind machines along the vertical axes of the building.

While most would argue that the unconventional design of Dragonfly would be more suited to Dubailand than New York, the conceptual design tackles the contemporary dilemma of food production and agriculture in a city sorely lacking in the horizontal space required to do so, as well as attempting to achieve this in an ecologically sound and renewable way by merging production and consumption in the heart of the city.

John Edwards
Reporter

source: http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com
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ION Orchard, Singapore, Singapore

Posted by ewanvfe on 18/05/2009


Groundbreaking retail and residential project set to open in Singapore
Construction of the groundbreaking ION Orchard by Benoy is set to complete in Singapore, providing the city’s most expensive accommodation and a new visual icon for South East Asia. Providing Singapore’s first monocoque façade and canopy structure and one of the largest media walls in Asia, the design is a conquest in innovation in the East.

Over 400 shops and 175 ultra-luxe apartments, together with new public realms ensure the project is one of great significance to this central cosmopolitan district, situated at the junction of the Orchard Road, Orchard Boulevard and the Paterson Road-Scotts corridor.

At 218 m in height the Orchard Residences tower is set for completion in December while the retail centre and public realm will open in July when perhaps the most significant element of the design, the outer skin, will be complete. Inspired by the patterns and textures found in nature, Benoy has designed a fully three-dimensional free form curvilinear glass and metal façade to wrap around the retail component of the scheme. This large point-fixed glass structure includes the integrated media façade which has the potential to transform into one of the largest LED media walls in Asia. The design includes a large low resolution ‘seed façade’ and a smaller high resolution LED façade creating a new stage for public video screenings and advertisements. A double curved glass fully transparent Waterdrop has also been designed as an iconic MRT station entrance to the events space. The entire podium monocoque facade will be fitted with LEDs at each nodal point to illuminate the podium at night.

At the heart of the development sits a new 3,000 m2 public square. This new urban space will be a logical focal point for both large and small events – from festivals and shows to meetings and exhibitions. Other public areas include a 500 m2 art gallery and an observation deck.

Importantly, following the launch of Singapore’s sustainability blueprint in April, the project has received awards for its green credentials including BCA Green Mark Gold certificate from Singapore’s Building Construction Authority. ION Orchard was designed by Benoy with RSP Architects Planners & Engineers as the project architects.

Niki May Young
News Editor

source: http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com
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2014 Asian Games Stadium, Incheon, South Korea

Posted by ewanvfe on 18/05/2009


Populous wins Incheon stadium design for 2014 Asian Games
The global design practice, Populous, created by HOK Sport Venue Event, has won the architecture design competition for the USD $400M main stadium in Incheon, Korea, for the 2014 Asian games.

This is the first big win in Korea for Populous, which has designed Suncorp stadium in Brisbane, the Yankees new stadium in New York and is designing the main stadium in London for the 2012 Olympic Games.

The 70,000 seat multipurpose stadium will be designed to be reconfigured into a single sided grandstand of 30,000-seats, within a park, after the Asian games. It will be located between Incheon International Airport and Seoul, and will be the first landmark building people see when travelling to Seoul from the airport.

Populous will design the new stadium with the local firm Heerim Architects & Planners and will establish a team of at least 10 architects in Brisbane, the firm’s key Asian office, to work closely with Heerim in Incheon.

Populous senior principal Andrew James said: “Incheon Metropolitan City is a world class city, and this will be an innovative world class design, benchmarked against the best in the world.

“The key to the stadium’s success will be reducing it down and linking it into the surrounding parklands, to make it an open accessible building, for all its people. This way it can achieve a connection with the community that is vital to securing its long term sustainability and a true legacy for the people of Incheon.” Andrew James also paid tribute to the Queensland Government and the Lord Mayor of Brisbane for their help in securing the project: “Both Trade Queensland, through the Korean office, and the Lord Mayor of Brisbane, assisted with meetings and letters of introduction at the highest level. Both Governments are export focused which is a great help to firms such as us working in competitive Asian markets.”

source: http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com
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Maggie’s Centre – Fife, Kircaldy, United Kingdom

Posted by ewanvfe on 03/05/2009


Zaha Hadid’s striking design for cancer centre
The Maggie’s Centre Fife provides a resource and counselling centre for people with cancer. It is domestic in scale but unique in execution. The design is Zaha Hadid’s response to a brief set by Maggie’s, which challenged her to create a relaxed and aesthetically uplifting environment, where additional support outside of the more clinical hospital environment could be provided for those affected by cancer to build a life beyond cancer.

Externally the form of the Centre derives from a folding surface and a connecting ground slab. The folding surface articulates a directional emphasis of moving the visitor into a different space from the rest of the hospital grounds. By cladding the visible roof and two opposing walls with the same material and making the remaining elevations a mix of translucent and clear glass, the directional nature of this form is reinforced. Large overhangs of the roof are used to extend the building into the landscape on both sides. These overhangs protect the entrance doors on the north side whilst on the south side they provide solar shading to the glass elevation and partially cover the terrace.

Internally the arrangement of rooms is centered on an open plan kitchen with offi ces on the north elevation adjacent to the entrance. To offer privacy, the rooms to the east have a semi opaque façade. Visitors to Maggie’s Fife will have an unobstructed view through the centre to the south facing glass elevation to the hidden natural landscape of the hollow. The internal central space is kept as open and column free as possible. A ramp connects the main space to a lower platform containing the fl exi-hall. A system of shutters and sliding doors allows this space to be separated from the rest of the centre. The southern facing façade is floor-to-ceiling glazing with windows and doors allowing direct access to the terrace. The extension of the roof beyond the glazing and terrace gives a continuity between the inside / outside spaces. Triangular roof and wall skylights are scattered over the building to allow views, light and continuity of form into the space.

source: http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com
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Camp Nou, Barcelona, Spain

Posted by ewanvfe on 03/05/2009


Construction of Foster’s football mecca to commence later this year
Kicking off in Barcelona this week, the finals for the Champions League were in full force. A staggering 98,000 fans flood into the Football cathedral that is Camp Nou for each match, most unaware that the clock is ticking for the historic stadium as it stands. For commencing later this year is a Foster-designed transformation.

Inaugurated on 24 September 1957,Camp Nou has been the home of FC Barcelona ever since and host to numerous international matches. Already the largest stadium in Europe, Foster’s design will add a further 8,000 seats and create an exterior with panache in the home team’s colours.

At a projected cost of 250€ million, the evolution of Camp Nou will not only increase capacity, but will extend the middle aged stadium’s facilities to suit modern needs. Provisions for disabled people will be created throughout, TV broadcast and studio facilities will be added, and a new stadium Museum, public concourse, function rooms and hospitality facilities will transform the site from stadium to venue.

A new mosaic exterior composed of translucent panels will act as rain screen around the sides of the stadium allowing naturally ventilated concourse areas and will glow with integrated lighting at night creating a beacon of the football icon.

Niki May Young
News Editor

source: http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com
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Bird Island, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Posted by ewanvfe on 23/04/2009


Graft offer undulating green home for island paradise
Described as the ‘test bed for sustainable living and responsible development’, Bird Island in Kuala Lumpur’s Sentul Park is an exclusive resort with an exclusive range of designers. 8 high-profile architects were invited: Atelier ten; Grant Associates; innovarchi; KplusK associates; MAD; Plasma Studios; and Zoka Zola alongside Graft to compete in the Green Homes competition to design 6 energy efficient residential dwellings for the 35 acre park.

Graft’s design, shown here, provides a model for sustainable architecture in which design is enhanced rather than compromised:

“We have applied an integrated strategy of developing a zero-energy house that seamlessly dovetails the economic and environmental advantages of environmentally friendly living with the needs of a demanding and cosmopolitan clientele,” say Graft. “The environmental and economic features of this way of living do not conflict with our client’s lifestyle; rather it furthers their ability to comfortably enjoy their time at home.”

Achieving a pre-certification LEED Homes Rating of Platinum, with more than 90 credits, the design features include a highly reflective tensile silicon coated fabric skin which guides the residents views out to the park as well as 50% of solar energy out to space preventing overheating; construction materials are chosen when appropriate from renewable or recycled materials; cooling effects are created through a cold rainwater harvesting system collected in spaces in the ceiling during the day; and cross ventilated during the night.

Bird Island is a development exclusive to the gated community of Sentul West, KL. Being developed by infrastructure conglomerate YTL, the island is a ‘natural oasis’ which is home to many local and migratory birds.
source: http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com
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Christchurch Intergrated Airport, New Zealand, Christchurch, New Zealand

Posted by ewanvfe on 23/04/2009


HASSELL on site with new Christchurch Integrated terminal
Designed by HASSELL, in conjunction with celebrated local architects Warren and Mahoney the new Christchurch Integrated Terminal is currently on site.

This major project sees the demolition of the existing 1960 domestic terminal and the creation of a new state of the art facility that will provide Christchurch International Airport Limited with facilities of an international standard to service the growing air travel market within New Zealand.

The development consists of the new terminal, offices, a multi-storey car park, surface car parking with a landscape plaza and airside works. It is currently the largest construction project in the South Island. Responding to the latest developments in air travel, the new terminal is unique in a number of ways: its new check-in hall accommodating both domestic and international customers is designed to accommodate innovative self service kiosks and compact check-in desks facilitating faster passenger processing; traditionally separate airside departure lounges have been centralised to maximize flexibility, improve wayfinding and maximize space utilisation; and landside approach is across an innovative traffic free plaza., rather than by crossing the multitude of roads currently at the terminal.

Swing gates help with flexibility – allowing certain gates to be used either as Domestic or International configuration – some flights can arrive internationally and carry on Domestically on the same gate.

The client, Christchurch International Airport Limited, is the first Carbon Neutral Airport Company in the Southern Hemisphere and from the beginning of the project was committed to ensure that significant ESD initiatives would be employed in the design of the complex facility. The biggest contributor to future carbon saving is the use of the artesian layer under Canterbury Plains which has a 5+ degree difference in winter or summer. The project utilises this difference by taping into this layer with a closed loop heat exchange removing the need for traditional chiller technology.

The terminal will remain in full operation during a complex staged construction and commissioning process which will be completed in 2011 in time for the Rugby World Cup.
source: http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com
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National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

Posted by ewanvfe on 23/04/2009


Firm appointed to £73 million heart Centre
Broadway Malyan has been appointed to a £73 million project to design a new building for the National Heart Centre Singapore. The appointment gives the firm’s new Singapore office, which opened last year, a significant boost.

The 35,299 sq m building will play part of the wider masterplanning for the redevelopment of Singapore General Hospital’s Outram Campus and is designed in conjunction by the company’s Singapore and Weybridge offices and in collaboration with Ong & Ong Architects.

“The building’s design has been born out of a multi-disciplinary process focussing on the social, economic, environmental and technological requirements of the National Heart Centre Singapore,” commented Jason Pomeroy, director for Broadway Malyan’s Singapore office. “Fundamental to this is our ethos for the building – Placing People First – a philosophy which will ensure the needs of the individual are met at the Centre in their everyday working, living, playing and healing lives, be they the patient, doctor or visitor.”

The majority of visitors and patients will enter the ten storey building via a spacious, naturally lit concourse area. This will lead into a large and welcoming reception including information and quarantine zone plus retail shops and cafes, via which department reception areas and the upper levels of the hospital can be reached.

The operational layout of the building has been set to minimise travel distances for patients and staff. The first six floors of the building will contain facilities for a day surgery, operating theatres, clinics, laboratories, radiology and retail facilities. Levels seven to ten have appropriately been designated for non-patient areas including medical records, research laboratories, staff training, a library and administrative offices.

Providing social connectivity, the building will feature a collection of different healthcare related and social functions arranged, like a collegiate, around open spaces not dissimilar to the medicinal courtyard gardens of the Middle Ages. These internal and external open spaces are designed to expedite healing via the provision of natural light, ventilation and views for patients while also providing planting that acts as a carbon sponge, noxious pollutant filter and heat island reducer. The internal open spaces have also been maximised to encourage footfall through the building’s open spaces creating heightened opportunities for social interaction and increased drive to retail opportunities, while also improving operational efficiency for staff and mitigating visitor and patient anxiety via the provision of clear routes through the Centre.

Recognising the often swift advances in medical and healthcare technologies, the structure of the building is flexible and adaptable to change both internally and externally.

Utilising modern methods of modularization to facilitate and ease the speed of construction, it is expected that, subject to planning approval, demolition works for the new Heart Centre will begin in September 2009 with build completion expected in Spring 2012.
source: http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com
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Oil Rig Platform Resort and Spa, Gulf Sea, United States

Posted by ewanvfe on 19/04/2009


Winner of 2008 innovation award takes holiday-goers to new platforms
4000 oil rigs in the Gulf Sea could be turned into 80 million sq ft of luxury resorts for the wealthy if Morris Architects, designer of the Oil Rig Resort and Spa concept have their way.

As the recent winning design of the Radical Innovation in Hospitality Award, the concept which would transform rigs which would otherwise be destroyed into capital-gaining resorts, is awarded fresh prestige, and the architects a $10,000 prize.

Each rig hotel would be able to accommodate over 300 guest rooms and luxury suites, a ballroom, restaurants, retail, pool and poolside bar as well as providing a marina for yachts, a casino, a dive bell for below sea excursions and facilities for water sports.

Encouraged as an ecological alternative to the destruction of the rigs which, according to Morris Architects, will all be decommissioned within the next century, the renovation would help to preserve the marine life gathered among the legs of the rigs. They would also function autonomously with alternative forms of energy production including wind, wave and solar.

The designers hope that the rigs could be used as ports of call for cruise ships travelling between the Caribbean and Mexico.

Niki May Young
News Editor
source: http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com
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