architecture-interior-art

architecture-interior-art

The University of Oregon Athletic Medicine Center, Eugene, Oregon, United States

Posted by ewanvfe on 18/05/2009

Design as a means of achieving highest standards of athlete care
The University of Oregon Athletic Medicine Center (AMC) offers an unusual blend of contemporary medical technology and imagery to both physically treat and psychologically invigorate Oregon’s student-athletes.

Reflecting the University of Oregon’s holistic approach to athlete care, the AMC incorporates tools that address the health of the entire athlete. While most sports therapy facilities focus on physical therapy and strength training only, Oregon’s athletic department can utilise this space to provide and receive dental and vision care, acupuncture, and nutritional and dietary oversight via the various treatment rooms. Also included are meeting rooms; a pharmacy; x-ray bay; treadmills and exercise bikes; three hydro-therapy tubs; a hot and cold tub and a Bod Pod® capsule to calculate body fat.

To inspire, the facility features a variety of design gestures that pay tribute to its athletic function and purpose. For example, a dynamic, internally illuminated white Corian bench in the Center’s seating area was conceived of as an unraveling roll of tape, while nearby white oak wall paneling is both branded with the names of important Oregon coaches and mounted so as to mimic a bandage wrapping a limb.

Adding further inspiration and contextual richness to the seating area, and providing a clear link to Oregon’s rich athletic history, are four sandblasted glass pictorial screens portraying a variety of athletes whose images were created using the names of former University of Oregon athletes, with the names of star players highlighted in Oregon yellow. Other branding gestures include 3,000 aluminum rods that form the University’s “O” logo on the glass wall above the nutrition bar, the custom “O” hardware on drawers, and the yellow and green Oregon logo colors present throughout the space.

source: http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com
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